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Kate Law

Nottingham Research Fellow, Faculty of Arts

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Biography

I am a feminist historian of the British Empire who specialises in modern South African and Zimbabwean history. To date, my research has examined the relationship between transnational networks, settler colonialism and women's colonial histories, principally focusing on white women and the ambiguities of race and gender in the Southern African region. My first monograph, Gendering the Settler State: White Women, Race, Liberalism and Empire in Rhodesia c.1950-1980 (Routledge, New York, 2016, paperback 2017) began the long overdue task of "gendering" the history of British decolonisation, through examining how "liberal" women responded to UDI, guerrilla insurgency and the coming of independence in colonial Zimbabwe.

I was awarded my PhD from the University of Sheffield in 2012, following which I became a Vice-Chancellor's postdoctoral fellow, and latterly lecturer in Gender Studies at the University of the Free State, South Africa. Prior to joining Nottingham in October 2018, I was senior lecturer at the University of Chichester where I taught widely on the Modern History programme. I have successfully supervised three PhD theses and welcome enquiries from those interested in modern Southern African history; women's history; and aspects of "new" imperial history.

I'm a committee member of Women's History Network (WHN), and currently manage the WHN blog. Please do get in touch if you would like to write for us!

Teaching Summary

I am currently a tutor on The Contemporary World since 1945.

Research Summary

My current project, 'Fighting Fertility: The Politics of Race and Contraception in Apartheid South Africa, c.1980-1994', grows out of my interest in the histories of female activism and liberal… read more

Recent Publications

Current Research

My current project, 'Fighting Fertility: The Politics of Race and Contraception in Apartheid South Africa, c.1980-1994', grows out of my interest in the histories of female activism and liberal networks in Southern Africa, and has received funding from the Wellcome Trust, the British Academy and the South African National Research Foundation. Transnational in focus, it concentrates on the efforts of the women's wing of the British Anti-Apartheid Movement (AAM) to have apartheid South Africa banned from the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) due to its use of the controversial contraceptive injection Depo-Provera, whilst also interrogating the shifting meaning of "Family Planning" during the lifespan of the apartheid regime.

Department of History

University of Nottingham
University Park
Nottingham, NG7 2RD

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